How to Create Compelling Characters

Revealing Character

Story-telling is a process of
EXPLORING
DISCOVERING
REVEALING


Controversy:  Plot v Character
What will happen next? Or What will the character do next?

  • Plot only – engrossing but forgettable
  • Characters only – may not be dramatic enough

The Golden Mean – The best stories are a well-balanced blend of both.

Why we love great characters

  • People yearn to understand human experience
  • Readers empathize with characters taking an active role in their lives – wish fulfillment
  • A believable and sympathetic character gives the reader an anchor
  • Stories with compelling characters remain in our minds long after the last page is read

For characters to be compelling, the reader must have strong feelings about them.
Usually, the main character should be sympathetic.

Conflict is the soul of the story.
The character has a goal.
He meets obstacles.
The result is conflict.

Character vs. Character
Character vs. nature, the system or other entity
Character in conflict with himself


A character’s goal hints at his nature.
His nature is revealed best by the way he responds to obstacles.

What makes a character sympathetic?

  • Weakness – flaws or vices in characters make them appear more human – easier for reader to identify with
  • Strength – Strengths play to reader wish fulfillment

 

Sympathetic strengths:
Honesty
Courage
Love for another – or many others
Self-sacrifice
Passion for a good cause
Loyalty
Intelligence
Friendliness
Sense of Humor
Etc.


A well developed character has many traits – slowly revealed

In every scene – let the reader get to know your characters a little better.
Characters must be:

  • Plausible –  Reader must understand and believe their motivations
  • Consistent – act according to their nature, inconsistencies bump us out of the story
  • Unpredictable – surprising but still consistent
  • Dynamic – able to change in response to experience

SWOT Analysis – strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, threats

Characters may be revealed by:

  • Actions
  • speech
  • inner thoughts
  • physical description
  • mannerisms
  • demographic details
  • possessions
  • advantages and disadvantages
  • relations with other characters
  • judgments by other characters
  • details of setting– a person’s home, car or workplace
  • backstory

Physical Actions
Physical actions and reactions show internal feelings.  They range from intense physical movements to small incidental gestures.  Actions can be choices, such as picking up a ringing phone – or not picking it up.  Doing nothing can be an action.

Speech
Dialogue is one of the best ways to reveal character.  Dialogue includes not only what is said but how it’s said.  Both are equally important.  Dialogue lets your reader listen in and judge for himself what kind of a person is speaking.

What about Internal Monologue?

Internal monologue is one-sided dialog.  It’s a form of mind-reading that lets the reader peek into the brain of the POV character.  It can be useful, but it can also be problematic for three reason:

  1. People don’t think or feel in words, so the concept is artificial.
  2. Too often, it Tells what the character is thinking or feeling.  It doesn’t Show.
  3. It’s abstract, rather than dramatic – so it slows down your story.

Tip: Use internal monologue sparingly – and follow the rules of dialogue.  Keep it short, and reveal thoughts and feelings indirectly.

Physical Description – the Five Senses
Writers often focus on visual descriptions.  That’s important.  But using the other four senses adds richness to a scene.

Touch – texture of skin, hair, clothing
Taste – a kiss, taste of emotion in the mouth, air, food or drink
Smell – character smells of horses, car engines, cigarette smoke, sweat
Sound – voice, breathing, wheezing, sneezing, scratching, clicking teeth, whistling
Sight – Face, body, clothing, facial expressions, body language, posture

Tip: Use description in small bites.  It’s static and too much will slow the pace.

Back-story adds rich details
Write outside the story
Character biography – the life line

  • key turning points
  • past accomplishments
  • trials and sufferings
  • good deeds
  • bad behavior
  • deep secrets

Tip: Use back-story in small bites.  Like description, it can slow the pace.

What to Avoid

  • Stock characters, archetypes, stereotypes or pawns that merely act out the scenes.
  • Anything Predictable  – write it, recognize it, cut it
  • Shortcuts – Writers can’t be afraid of work.


EXERCISE:

Write down your main character’s name.
Now just think for a moment about what kind of person he/she is.

Write what he/she smells like.
Write how his/her voice sounds.
Write how his/her hair feels when you touch it.
Write about his/her posture.
Write his/her favorite saying.
Describe one of his/her trademark mannerisms.
E.g., clicking a ballpoint pen when he’s thinking
Write a habit he has that’s annoying.
Write a habit he has that’s endearing.
Write a line of dialog using his personal speech patterns.
Describe an object he always carries, everywhere he goes.

EXERCISE:

Write down your character’s overall story goal.
Write down one major obstacle to the goal.
Freewrite about how the character responds to the obstacle.


Take-away suggestion: write your character’s life line, birth to death.

The Gravity Pilot – Amazon Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 stars
Buckner’s best work yet, July 9, 2011
This review is from: The Gravity Pilot (Hardcover)

From the book jacket description it’s not apparent that this is a hard SF novel, but that is what Buckner has delivered with Gravity Pilot.
This is a layered story set against the backdrop of ecologic disaster 50 years in the future. On the surface it is the quest of a professional skydiver to rescue his girlfriend from the clutches of addiction and corporate greed. The action sequences are utterly convincing and immersive, and the author presents a fascinating prediction about how we’ll interact with the internet in the future.
But this book also explores other big issues:
addiction – both on a personal and a societal level
the exploitation of the young by the old
the evils of corporate ethos, profit above all else
the nature of love and sacrifice

I really enjoyed Gravity Pilot and I’m still thinking about it after reading it last week. It’s just a terrific SF novel by a writer at the height of her powers.

 

5 stars I bit the bullet, and I’m glad I did.
April 29, 2011
This review is from: The Gravity Pilot (Hardcover)

When I first read the description, I was a tad skeptical as to whether or not the book would be a good one. As an avid reader of “futuristic” stories, I decided to give this novel a go. This novel really surprised me with the vivid imagery and the story itself. This book provided me with a story that kept me hooked for the time it took to read – and boy it was a good read. It also gave an interesting look as to what the future could hold for technology. Considering some people have internet addictions now, this story pulls that to a whole new level with devices called Oculars, that allow one eye to be logged into the net at all times. The landscape that the book described was a great one – drippy ceilings down below Seattle, platinum colored smog that required oxygen masks, volcanic calderas, and much more. In short, this book provided a transition into a different reality that followed a young man going to great heights (and depths) to further his career and save his girlfriend from the net. If you weren’t sure about this book, do give it a chance and a read, and then a second to really get what went on.

The Gravity Pilot – GoodReads Review

Kristie’s review from GoodReads
[four stars]
“The Gravity Pilot” is an excellent Science Fiction novel with many layers. It’s a love story (drawing loosely from the myth of Orpheus), a sports novel, and a dystopian tale. The main character, Orr, is an Alaskan skydiver who makes a record-breaking jump that catapults him to stardom. That same jump has caused him to lose his girlfriend, Dyce, who had asked him to choose between her and diving. Dyce leaves Orr and Alaska to take a job in subterranean Seattle, and with her departure, Orr loses a bit of himself. Dyce finds that the job of her dreams is more of a nightmare, and she becomes one of the countless people who are addicted to fully immersive simulated worlds.

Even in the future, in a world that has nearly been destroyed, people still love their sports stars and a father/daughter team are quick to jump on the chance to exploit the young skydiver. They use his talents to create more complex and addictive sim games, and the plot builds as Orr tries to save himself as well as Dyce.

Trying to explain any more of the plot than that would give away too much — the story builds and plunges, dips and dives, and carries the reader on a path similar to some of the jumps that Orr makes. I definitely recommend it to Science Fiction fans.